Why mythology and autism?

Why mythology and autism?

The idea for this project started to take shape at a meeting in 2008 with a special needs teacher, who mentioned that, in her experience and those of her colleagues, autistic children often enjoy classical myth. I began to wonder why this might be the case, and whether – as a classicist who researches, and loves, classical myth – there was anything I could contribute. I started this blog to report on my progress which was often sporadic until the launch of the Warsaw-based European Research Council-funded project Our Mythical Childhood (2016-21) to trace the role of classics in children’s culture. My key contribution to the project is an exploration of classics in autistic children’s culture, above all by producing myth-themed activities for autistic children. This blog shares my progress, often along Herculean paths.





Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Chasing mythical beasts and other recent activites

Here's a quick report on current and future activities that bear on this blog's topic.
 
First: I'm looking forward to the opportunity to speak on my still-emerging mythology and autism project in Warsaw in 2016 at a conference organised by the wonderful Katarzyna Marciniak of the Chasing Mythological Beasts project. The image accompanying this post, from a painting by Matylda Tracewska comes courtesy of the project site.
 
Second: I'm currently writing a toolkit for Classics practitioners for the Higher Education Academy's Embedding Equality and Diversity in the Curriculum project.
 
Third: I've begun the process pulling together my blogs by setting up a single site which is still very much in progress: http://end-of-classics.weebly.com/